Orrell Lamberhead Green Academy

Believe Endeavour Succeed Together

Kershaw Street, Wigan, Lancashire, WN5 0AW

01942768760

enquiries@admin.lamberheadgreen.wigan.sch.uk

Pupil Premium

 

Pupil Premium Spending Rationale 

What is the Pupil Premium Grant?

The Pupil Premium Grant is allocated to children from families who are, or have been, eligible for free school meals (FSM), within the last six years. The grant is also made available to support children of service personnel and those who are looked after by the local authority (LAC).

 

What are our aims for the Pupil Premium Grant?

The aim of the Pupil Premium is to identify and implement strategies that help to increase social mobility and reduce the attainment gap between the most and least disadvantaged pupils nationally. Securing strong foundations in literacy and numeracy are key to success in any subject; strong literacy and numeracy are crucial for preparing children for life beyond school. Our PP spending plan reflects that belief

 

Who benefits from the Pupil Premium Grant?

John Dunford (PP Tzar) states

There is solid evidence that poor teaching disproportionately disadvantages deprived children. Equally, evidence tells us that excellent teaching disproportionately benefits them. So high quality teaching must be at the core of all pupil premium work. It follows that it is legitimate to spend PP funding on raising the quality of teach

https://johndunfordconsulting.co.uk/2014/10/11/ten-point-plan-for-spending-the-pupil-premium-successfully/

Orrell Lamberhead Green  Primary uses part of its PP Grant to improve the quality of teaching in the school so that PP children will disproportionally benefit from these improvements

However, improving teaching and the quality of interventions the school offers, means that many of the teachers and some of the interventions put in place are shared by children who are not in receipt of Pupil Premium funding. We do this in order to promote good progress for all children because creating an atmosphere in which all children succeed further promotes the success of children in receipt of PP funding.

 

 

 

What barriers do pupils eligible for the Pupil Premium Grant face?

The barriers and challenges disadvantaged pupils face are complex and varied- there is no single difficulty faced by all. However, we have identified several barriers that we believe are particularly relevant to our disadvantaged children in our context.

These are the key barriers we have identified:

  • Poor Literacy and Numeracy skills
  • Emotional and Social behavior
  • Poor attendance or punctuality

We allocate our Pupil Premium Grant to resources that aim to close the gaps in these areas.

How do we decide how to spend the Pupil Premium Grant?

In deciding how to use our Pupil Premium Grant, we draw upon the following sources:

 

  • Sutton Trust report: “The Pupil Premium: Next Steps”
  • Education Endowment Foundation Teaching and Learning Toolkit,
  • Research on disadvantaged pupils and the vocabulary gap, available
  • The support and professional experience of other successful schools in identifying what works best

 

From these sources we have identified the following priority areas for spending:

 

  • Evidence based literacy interventions: phonics, comprehension strategies, reading programmes.
  • Evidence based numeracy interventions: mastery maths
  • Small group and/or individual intervention groups
  • Pastoral team

 

 

Evaluation of PPG Impact 2017 -2018

EYFS

In line with EEF guidance that high quality pastoral support can have a +4 impact, this year the school funded two additional TAs for FS to support pupils with additional social and emotional needs

In FS this year, significantly less Disadvantage pupils achieved a GLD than their non-disadvantaged peers. (This was due to a gap in performance in reading and writing ELG) However, progress for disadvantage pupils was in line with the progress of their non-disadvantaged peers and better than their LA disadvantaged peers.

 

PP attaining ELG

NPP attaining ELG

PP STEPS OF PROGRESS

NPP STEPS OF PROGRESS

 

School

LA

School

LA

School

LA

School

LA

Reading

36

 

76

 

 

6.1

5.2

6.3

5.7

Writing

29

 

73

 

6

5

6.4

5.5

Number

64

 

82

 

6.1

5.3

6.3

5.6

Space, shape measure

71

 

89

 

5.8

5.3

6.3

5.6

 

 

Phonics

In line with EEF guidance that high quality phonic training can have a +4 impact, the school directs PPG to ensure high quality teaching of phonics and appropriate intervention. As a result, PP children usually attain highly in phonics

Year 1

2015

2016

2017

2018

Percentage passing

81%

93%

87%

85%

Number passing

72/89

57/61

52/60

52/61

Boys v Girls

76%v83%

86% v100%

78% v 94%

83% v 88%

PP v NPP

81%v76%

88% v 96%

77%v88%

67% v 91%

 

Year 2  Retake

2016

2017

2018

 

Percentage passing

97%

97%

98%

 

Number Passing

86/89

58/60

56/57

 

Boys v Girls

95% v 98%

96% v 97%

96% v 100%

 

PP v NPP

94% v 98%

100% v 95%

95% v 100%

 

 

This year, attainment in phonics for the PP group dipped and analysis of the group showed that of the 15 children that were entitled to PPG, 5 did not pass. However, 4 of these 5 children have complex SEND needs and whilst they did not pass the screening, they increased their score from and average to 3 in December to an average of 20 in June.  The other child who did not pass increased their score from 5 in December to 29 in June

 

Other KPIs

 

In line with research that shows

There is solid evidence that poor teaching disproportionately disadvantages deprived children. Equally, evidence tells us that excellent teaching disproportionately benefits them. So high quality teaching must be at the core of all pupil premium work. It follows that it is legitimate to spend PP funding on raising the quality of teach

https://johndunfordconsulting.co.uk/2014/10/11/ten-point-plan-for-spending-the-pupil-premium-successfully/

Orrell Lamberhead Green  Primary uses part of its PP Grant to improve the quality of teaching in the school so that PP children will disproportionally benefit from these improvements

 

As a result, in KS1 disadvantage pupils achieve better than their LA peers and the gap between Disadvantage and other pupils is narrower in school than in the comparative gap in the  LA

 

 

Expected standard

Higher standard

 

School Disadvantage

School other

LA Disadvantage

LA other

School Disadvantage

School other

LA

Disadvantage

LA

other

Reading

73

80

68

84

18

23

12

28

Writing

73

69

54

74

14

17

7

18

Maths

73

86

64

80

14

17

14

24

 

The school made use of the FFT KS1 benchmarking service this year. It shows that in comparison to all KS1 pupils nationally, PP value added was as follows

Reading +1.9

Maths +0.2

 

In addition, in KS2 disadvantage pupils achieve

  • better than other children in school at the expected standard in Maths and at the higher standards in Reading and Maths;
  • better than all children nationally,
  • better than their LA peers
  • the gap between Disadvantage and other pupils in school is diminished from KS1 and much narrower than in the comparative gap in the  LA

 

 

 

Expected standard

Higher standard

 

School Disadvantage

School other

LA Disadvantage

LA other

School Disadvantage

School other

LA

Disadvantage

LA

other

Reading

86

92

62

79

32

30

20

33

Writing

95

92

71

86

9

22

14

27

Maths

95

92

69

86

32

30

16

30

 

 

Progress of Disadvantage groups in KS2 is

  • reading +2.8
  • writing +2.6
  • maths +3.9

 

In addition, there is a rising trend of attainment at the expected standard for disadvantage pupils in all subjects in KS2